Online Vein Self-Assessment

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Medical History

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Are you currently or have you ever been pregnant?

Yes

  • Pregnancy can increase your risk of vein disease due to elevated
    progesterone levels.
  • Progesterone relaxes the muscle in vein walls, allowing them to stretch; for this reason many women notice the development of vein problems during pregnancy.
  • It is important to discuss these risks with your doctor during pregnancy.

No

  • Pregnancy can increase your risk of vein disease due to elevated
    progesterone levels.
  • Progesterone relaxes the muscle in vein walls, allowing them to stretch; for this reason many women notice the development of vein problems during pregnancy./li>
  • If you plan to get pregnant, be sure to discuss these risks with your doctor.

Have you ever experienced a physical trauma and/or surgery?

Yes

  • Soft tissue injuries can result from impact, such as getting hit with a hard object, which often causes damage to vein networks and can subsequently lead to thrombosis.
  • Post-surgical patients also carry risks for blood clots, often due to inactivity or immobility.
  • The damaged veins may not be evident for some time, so it is important
    to know that you may still be at risk of developing vein issues well after
    your trauma.

No

  • Soft tissue injuries can result from impact, such as getting hit with a hard object, which often causes damage to vein networks and can subsequently lead to thrombosis.
  • Post-surgical patients also carry risks for blood clots, often due to inactivity or immobility.
  • If you experience a trauma in the future, be sure to discuss your risk of vein disease with your physician.

To the best of your knowledge, do you have a family history of vein disease?

Yes

  • Heredity is the number one contributing factor that causes vein disease.
  • If you have immediate family members who have vein issues, you are at a
    greater risk of developing them as well.

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No

  • Heredity is the number one contributing factor that causes vein disease.
  • If you do not have a family history of vein disease, you are somewhat less likely to develop them yourself; however, other risk factors, such as those addressed in this assessment, can greatly contribute to potential vein issues.

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Unsure

  • Because heredity is the number one contributing factor that causes vein
    disease, it is useful to know if you have a family history of vein issues.
  • If you have immediate family members who have vein issues, you are at a
    greater risk of developing them as well.

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